WORLD FOOD MOSCOW

WORLD FOOD MOSCOW

For more than 30 years, World Food Moscow has maintained status of the main autumn business platform providing food market leaders with space for real-life communication.

In 2021, World Food Moscow was attended by 16,430 wholesalers and retailers, food service providers, HoReCa specialists, as well as food manufacturers from 82 Russian regions and 75 countries. Among WorldFood Moscow visitors are executives, deputy executives, managers and specialists of such companies as Azbuka Vkusa, Auchan, Billa, VkusVill, Globus, Delikateska.ru, Dixy, Komandor, Krasnoe i Beloe, Lenta, Magnit, Magnolia, Miratorg, O’KEY, Perekrestok, Pyaterochka, Utkonos, Food City, Shokoladnitsa, Yandex Shop, Metro Cash&Carry, Ozon, Spar, X5 Retail Group, and many others.

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Russian retailers take preventive measures against Covid-19

Russian retailers take preventive measures against COIVD-19

Lenta, the 4th largest Russian food retailer, installs protective screens

To protect their cashiers, Lenta, N4 Russian food retailer, is being installing plastic screens. The work has been completed in all 249 retailer’s hypermarkets, and will be completed in its 131 supermarkets by the end of March. It is one among other measures taken by the retailer: the improvement of ventilation systems work, more frequent cleaning of the premises, temperature control for stuff and the installation of disinfection units in every store.

Magnit sends its staff to remote work

Magnit, the second largest Russian food retailer, is going to send half of their office staff for the remote work, in the first place, pregnant women and 50 years old and more employees. Those who cannot work remotely will communicate with all third partners by phone. Total staff of Magnit by the end of 2019 was 308,000, including 50,000 of office workers.

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Russian growers of berries will discuss the berry market outlook at Berries of Russia conference

Bilberries - Russian growers of berries will discuss the berry market outlook at Berries of Russia conference

The 3rd International Conference «Berries of Russia 2020» will be organized by the Russian Berry Union and FruitNews Information Agency on February 27–28, 2020 in Kazan.

The participants are berries breeders and growers, the representatives of nurseries and transform industry, the manufacturers of plant protection and hothouses equipment, traders and retailers, scientific and educational institutions. They will share their opinions and suggestions, evaluate berries production and market outlook, find out the news concerning technologies, berries varieties, etc.

Berries Union joins berries growers and processors and aims to stimulate the development of Russian berries industry, the increase of berries offer and quality improvement.

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Russia imposes temporary ban on Chinese citrus imports

Russia imposes temporary ban on Chinese citrus imports

 

The Russian Federal Service for Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance (Rosselkhoznadzor) has announced a temporary ban on imports of citrus from China, following the detection of harmful organisms in shipments, according to Russia Business Today. An initial warning was made in December, but the measure became effective as of January 6. According to the announcement on the official Rosselkhoznadzor website, Russia will temporarily restrict citrus imports from China until effective measures are implemented to comply with Russian standards regarding the safety of imported food.

Last year, after interceptions of Chinese stone fruits and pip fruits containing harmful organisms like the Oriental fruit fly, Russia suspended the import of many fruits from China, such as plums, nectarines, apricots, peaches, cherries, apples and pears. China responded by inviting Russia to audit its agricultural inspection and quarantine control systems. However, Russia declared that it was not satisfied with the results of the audit.

 

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Gulf and Russia record rises in citrus imports

Gulf and Russia record rises in citrus imports

 

Taking the Gulf market as a whole, citrus consumption climbed steadily between 2012 and 2016 (from 1.6 million tons to 1.9 million tons), before dropping off slightly in 2017 (1.68 million tons). The main suppliers of fresh citrus to the Gulf in 2017 were Egypt (525,000 tons), South Africa (430,000 tons), Turkey (120,000 tons), Pakistan (110,000 tons), Lebanon (47,000 tons) and Spain (43,000 tons).

Russia’s fresh citrus market consisted of 3.9 million tons of fruit in 2017. The category is divided between oranges (37%), satsumas (30%), lemons (14%), clementines (12%) and grapefruit (7%). The country’s citrus imports climbed steadily between 2004 and 2013 (from 0.82 to 1.68 million tons), before falling off slightly. The major supplier of citrus to the Russian market is Turkey (38%), followed by Egypt (16%), Morocco (15%), South Africa (9%) and China (8%).

 

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Magnit opens the 20,000th store

Magnit opens the 20,000th store

Potato, onion and apples, the most frequent purchases

Magnit, the second largest Russian retailer, has recently opened its 20,000th store. It is located in Moscow region and is equipped with cutting-edge technologies: electronic price tags, mobile bar-code printers, self-service cashiers. The store area is 600 square meters; the assortment includes 6,000 SKU.

By the way, the survey organised by the analytics of Magnit showed that top-5 most frequent purchase in convenience stores are potatoes, onions, apples, bread and chicken.

Russian consumers’ concern about waste

46% of Russian consumers consider waste the most vital ecological challenge, revealed a survey carried out by the Russian research agency VCIOM. Contributing to the problem’s solution, 40% of buyers choose the recycling package, 30% opt for unpacked goods, and 23% discard dangerous waste in special containers. Some retailers install such containers in their stores.

Russian retailers are concerned about waste challenge too. For instance, X5 Retail Group dispatches for recycling all used carton and plastic package. Besides the retailer plans to start selling goods to customers’ package. As for other waste, rotten fruit and vegetables actually account for 45% of all the trash in stores and distribution centers. It would be wise to use them as compost.

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Russia’s apple crop projected to break 1.5 million-ton barrier

Russia’s apple crop projected to break 1.5 million-ton barrier

Russia’s 2018/19 apple production is forecast at 1,506,100 tons, according to USDA. Nevertheless, despite being a major producer, Russia imported 858,600 tons in 2017/18. Imported volumes of apple are predicted to decrease to 815,000 tons in 2018/19. Similarly, Russia’s imports of table grapes and pears are also expected to fall this year, to 270,000 tons and 352,000 tons, respectively, due to the rise in domestic production.

Russia’s apple production area expanded by 1% in 2018/2019 to 212,000 hectares, as orchards restructure to accommodate new more productive varieties. The horticultural sector has been supported by government subsidies of US$194.8 million between 2013 and 2018 to compensate for the lack of imports from the EU and the US.

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Massive growth of Russian vegetable output

Massive growth of Russian vegetable output

Russia’s Ministry of Agriculture has announced that greenhouse vegetable production is set to hit 1.3 million tons this year, vastly outstripping last year’s record crop (1.1 million tons). And this exponential growth is showing no sign of slowing down, with forecasts of reaching around 2 million tons within five years, thanks partly to sizeable government funding, which almost doubled last year to Rbs240 million. The country’s winter greenhouse production area climbed by over 10% to 2,500ha in 2018, with the strategic Stavropol Territory seeing a 5% increase in volumes to 290,500 tons. Average yields stood at 43kg/m2 in 2018, a rise of 26% cent over 2016. Meanwhile, in March, the first crop of cucumbers and tomatoes will be harvested at a new greenhouse in the Ryazan region just outside Moscow.

 

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Turkish fresh produce exports to Russia skyrocket with stabilised relations

turkish fresh produce

Turkey’s fresh produce exports have been given a sizeable boost this year by the end to the conflict with Russia. In the first four months of 2018, exports climbed 25% compared to the same period in 2017, reaching US$794 million, according to the Uludag Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Exporters’ Association (UYMSIB). In volume terms, 1.6 million tons of fresh fruit and vegetables were exported, representing a rise of 17%.

Exports to Russia rocketed by 125%, from US$90 million to $202 million. Total shipments to Russia went up by 91% to around 315,000 tons. These exports to Russia contributed 70% of Turkey’s increase in revenue in the four-month period. Exports to the EU were also up, with Turkish goods gaining access to new markets such as the Scandinavian countries.

Following a military altercation between the two countries in January 2016, Russia banned imports of Turkish fruits and vegetables including tomatoes, oranges, apples, apricots, cabbage, broccoli, mandarins, pears, peaches, cucumbers, plums, strawberries, onions, and cloves, and also poultry.

 

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Russia to end reliance on imported potato

patata russia

With the on-going sanctions limiting Russia’s imports, the country is reshaping its domestic potato production so that the country no longer has to rely on the world to provide its French fries. In 2017, Russia imported 94% of its French fries but has now invested in the necessary equipment to produce it locally, according to Sergey Korolev, head of Russia’s National Horticultural Union. With the market demand currently for around 106,000 tons annually, the new equipment has the capacity to produce 110,000 tons. “This will also contribute to the preservation of jobs at newly established processing enterprises, and will increase the safety and quality of the product,” said Korolev.

Large firms like McDonalds are also turning to locally sourced production, which until now was not considered of high enough quality. This also ensures greater economic stability in the face of currency volatility, fluctuating oil prices and foreign sanctions.

Meanwhile, the Russian Government is considering a bill proposing a complete ban or restriction on agricultural products, raw materials and food products originating in the US or other countries that support the US sanctions.