Posted on

Better campaign expected for Mexican citrus

Better campaign expected for Mexican citrus

Mexico’s 2020/21 orange crop is forecast to partially rebound after drought reduced last year’s crop by almost 40%, according to USDA data. While orange consumption is projected higher than last season’s level, it should remain below average levels due to the ongoing effects of COVID-19 sanitary measures that have affected the food service and hospitality channels. As a result, a greater proportion of fruit is expected to be sent to the processing industry. Residual soil health effects and low producer investments in orchard rehabilitation will prohibit full production recovery. Lack of government support for drought recovery, production inputs, and pest mitigation is likely to prevent significant sector growth in the coming years.

Exports in 2020/21 are forecast at 61,000 tons due to strong US demand for fresh consumption.  Most oranges shipped to the US are Navel grown in Sonora, as the state is free of fruit fly. Imports are estimated at 30,000 tons, exclusively from the US, primarily for fresh consumption at the border region.

Posted on

Mexico reports slightly larger avocado crop 

Mexico reports slightly larger avocado crop 

Mexican avocado production for 2020/21 (July/June) is forecast at 2.41 million tons, up slightly from last campaign, due to continued expansion and excellent growing conditions, according to FAS data. Hass is the main variety (97%), followed by Criollo and Fuerte.

Mexican exports are forecast at 1.35 million tons, up 6% from 2019/20, driven by increased demand in the US.  Despite the COVID-19 pandemic and challenges, avocado demand in the US remains strong and is forecast to increase 6% to 1.02 million tons. According to APEAM, the state of Michoacán alone exported 139,954 tons to other countries, including Dubai and the UAE. This represents a fall of 6% from the previous campaign, as is mainly due to the COVID-19 pandemic and increased transportation and logistics prices.  

Source: APEAM

Photo: APEAM

Posted on

Mexico’s orange producers face difficult season

© Alexandra Sautois, Eurofresh Distribution

 

Mexican orange producers anticipate their lowest crop since the early 1990s. The 2019/20 (Nov-Oct) crop is expected to reach 2.53 million tons, 45% lower than previous forecasts due to the ongoing drought and high temperatures that have severely reduced yield, sizes and quality. Orange production has been harder hit than other citrus fruits because many orange trees are older and require more energy to produce fruit. Additionally, many small producers lack irrigation technology and have poor crop management practices. Mexico is also facing issues with citrus greening, or Huanglongbing (HLB), caused by bacteria introduced by psyllids, which makes citrus trees produce misshapen, partially green fruit.

In the 2019/20 campaign, Mexico’s orange exports are expected to reach 60,000 tons, according to USDA data. Most is shipped to the US, where demand for vitamin c sources is currently high due to the covid-19 pandemic. Meanwhile, Mexico’s lemon/lime exports in the 2019/20 campaign are expected to reach 755,000 tons.

Posted on

Infoagro Exhibition México postponed until July 1-3

The COVID-19 pandemic has led the organisers of the first Infoagro Exhibition Mexico to postpone the event to guarantee the health of exhibitors and visitors. Originally scheduled to take place from May 6 to 8, it will now be held from July 1 to 3, 2020, when it is hoped the situation will have improved enough to allow the first international fair for intensive agriculture and auxiliary industry in Latin America to go ahead. The organisers have assured attendees that all the necessary measures will be in place to guarantee their safety.

The event will take place at the Mazatlan International Center (Mazatlán, Sinaloa), and will pay homage to the efforts of the agricultural sector to guarantee the supply of food throughout the world. The expo will also offer a golden opportunity for companies dedicated to agricultural production and for the auxiliary industry to strengthen their ties and ensure a full economic recovery after such difficult moments.

For more info:
Lydia Medero
Responsable de Comunicación de INFOAGRO EXHIBITION
Tel: 902 300 103  E-mail: lmedero@infoagro.com

Posted on

US dependent on Mexican citrus

Consumption of fresh citrus on the US market totalled 3.9 million tons in 2018. Oranges only account for 47% of total citrus consumption and soft citrus represents only 19%. Instead, market share is higher than in the EU for lime (13%), lemon (13%) and grapefruit (8%). In 2017, US imports of citrus totalled 944,000 tons, having climbed steadily from 580,000 in 2008. Around 43% of imported citrus to the US is sourced from neighbouring Mexico, with the next largest supplier being Chile (29%), followed by South Africa (7.7%), Peru (6%) and Morocco (5.4%). As the US has its own large orange and soft citrus production in Florida and California, lemon and lime represent the largest category of imported citrus (44%).

Posted on

US imposes 17.5% tariff on Mexican tomatoes

US imposes 17.5% tariff on Mexican tomatoes

It’s not just Chinese imports that are subject to US tariff hikes. As of Tuesday 7th May, the US has imposed a 17.5% tariff on Mexican tomato imports. The move comes following unsuccessful negotiations to renew a 2013 agreement that suspended a US anti-dumping investigation. The US Commerce Department said in February that the US would halt the investigation as long as Mexican producers sold their tomatoes above a pre-set price.

“As of tomorrow a tariff of 17.5 percent will be applied on the value of the product,” said Luz Maria de la Mora, Mexico’s undersecretary of foreign trade. “It’s going to affect financial flows but that is going to be directly transferred to US consumers.”  The measures will remain in place until a new suspension agreement is reached and could lead to immediate and significant price rises for US consumers. Mexico exports about US$2 billion of tomatoes to the US each year.

Posted on

US to exit tomato trade agreement with Mexico

US to exit tomato trade agreement with Mexico

The US has announced it will withdraw from the tomato suspension agreement with Mexico by May 7, 2019, although this does not mean the end of negotiations. According to the RaboResearch, the withdrawal could still be avoided if both parties can reach a renewed suspension agreement.

Half of the fresh tomatoes currently consumed in the US are imported from Mexico. If there is no new suspension agreement by May 7, the US will impose a temporary anti-dumping duty of 17.5% on imports of Mexican tomatoes. The US International Trade Commission will also decide whether or not the US tomato industry has been harmed by tomato imports from Mexico. If substantial harm is the verdict, a new anti-dumping duty will be imposed. Alternatively, if no harm is determined, all restrictions to imports of fresh tomatoes will be removed.

Posted on

Mexico’s citrus forecast to rise in 2018/19

Mexico’s citrus forecast to rise in 2018/19

Mexico’s citrus crop is production in Mexico is expected to rise in 2018/19, thanks to excellent weather conditions and improved productivity. The country’s orange and lime harvest is predicted to be higher, with total orange output reaching 4.6 million tons, according to USDA data. Exports of oranges for processing have also increased, due to Florida’s drop in orange output. Planted area of oranges will remain fairly stable at 341,000 hectares. Productivity is up to around 14.3 tons per hectare, from 13.9 tons per hectare in 2017/18, which was affected by weather issues.

Posted on

Mexico’s citrus crop up 3% in 2018/19

Mexico’s citrus crop up 3% in 2018/19

Citrus production in Mexico is expected to increase in 2018/19 thanks to optimal weather conditions and improved yields. Fresh orange and lime production is forecast to continue to grow. Due to the decrease in orange production in Florida, fresh fruit exports to the US for processing from the north of Mexico have increased. Orange producers indicate a strong demand from processors due to attractive orange juice future prices.

Orange production area is stable at 341,000 hectares planted, but productivity is up to approximately 14.3 tons per hectare. Although no official forecast has been published, the USDA forecast for Mexico’s 2018/19 orange harvest is 4.6 million tons. The state of Veracruz is by far the largest producer of oranges, with 50% of the planted area and 51% of production. The main variety is Valencia. Approximately US$1.85 million dollars have been dedicated to a citrus greening campaign to protect orchards in Veracruz. Producer prices from Veracruz began in November 2018 at US$0.10/Kg. 

Source: USDA

Posted on

Mexico’s berry exports reach US$2.1 billion

Mexico’s berry exports reach US$2.1 billion

Berries occupy third place in the agricultural exports of Mexico, only after avocado and beer, generating US$2.1 billion and 350,000 direct jobs. The sector is working on a collective brand, Berries de México. (Source: SAGARPA-SIAP Atlas Agroalimentario 2017)

Aneberries members represent 90% of Mexico’s berry exports. The association was founded nine years ago to ensure safety and phytosanitation standards and increase the country’s presence in international markets. Juan José Flores Garcia, CEO of Aneberries, said, “We seek to bring the Mexican industry together in an organised and specialised manner, protecting the interests of the union and seeking to reach its maximum potential in a profitable and sustainable way. Today we have 29 partner companies and we invite producers and exporters who are not members to join us to continue positioning and increasing the consumption of berries in Mexico. Within our areas of work, we are focused on the emerging markets of Southeast Asia, the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East, and on achieving self-regulation, encouraging and strengthening social responsibility, and converting blackberry producing areas affected by phytosanitary problems.” Mexican berries are produced and exported almost throughout the whole year, with August and September being the months of low volumes. Although there was a slight decrease in the 2018 season compared to the previous one (as of October 2018 data) (source: SIAVI), Mexico’s production growth is dramatic. The main advantage it has over its competitors is that it produces the four species throughout the year, with raspberries and blackberries having the greatest volume share, followed by strawberries and blueberries, with the latter benefitting most from new technology and with very good profitability. Today, Mexico exports to 35 countries on four continents. Around 97% of exports are concentrated in the US and Canada, while 1.4% go to Europe and 1% to Asia. General manager, Juan José Flores García, sees Japan as a very good destination for blueberries: “Aneberries seeks to expand exports to Asian markets, where the reduction in tariffs will be key. That is one of the main challenges. In addition, we seek to be an example in terms of responsibility, sustainability and safety, which is why certification is promoted with different labels, such as GLOBALG.A.P., PRIMUS, SMETA, FAIR TRADE, USDA Organic, JAS, SRRC (Risk Reduction System) of Contaminants), among others.”

Since 2011, Aneberries has organised an annual international congress, recognised sector as the sector’s main berry event. It is aimed at producers, exporters and suppliers, where you can access conferences, work tables and exhibition stands. The 2018 edition saw an attendance of 1,650 participants, and Flores Garcia said that figure is expected to increase by over 25% by 2019.