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Thailand improves traceability of fruit exports to China 

Thailand improves traceability of fruit exports to China 

 

The Thai-Chinese Chamber of Commerce has signed a deal with CCIC Thailand to improve the traceability of Thai fruit exported to China, following a new traceability requirement for all imported farm products into China. CCIC Thailand, which is the local office of China’s largest quality assessment and traceability services provider, will help with legal procedures, as well as requests for health and hygiene certificates for certain fruit.

Thai-Chinese Chamber of Commerce president Narongsak Puttapornmongkol said that Thai fruit products have often been subjected to lengthy customs clearances at China, but that the new service provided by CICC Thailand will help shorten this process to no longer than three days, as product information can be traced back from a scan of a QR code. It is hoped that this streamlined process will support Thailand’s fresh produce exports.

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Guaranteed traceability of all frozen imported foods in Beijing 

Guaranteed traceability of all frozen imported foods in Beijing 
Photo: Global Times

The Beijing Cold Chain Food Traceability Platform has expanded to include all imported foods stored below or at zero degrees Celsius. Consumers can use the WeChat social media app to scan tracking codes in stores and find product information relating to safety and traceability, entry inspection and quarantine certificates, Covid-19 test results, and disinfection certificates.

The measures will go some way to assuaging consumer fears about imported foods after scares relating to Covid-19 associated with imported frozen products, including frozen vegetables, frozen fruits and frozen fruit juices. 

 

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The European Packaging Forum: Congress & Get-together on May 14, 2020

The European Packaging Forum: Congress & Get-together on May 14, 2020

The European Packaging Forum is a precisely tailored congress event for the fruit and vegetable industry, focusing on marketing, sustainability, traceability, consumer and trade acceptance, innovative solutions, logistics, protection and functionality, hygiene and law. These are the topics that the experts from all stages of the value chain will be discussing on 14 May 2020 in Düsseldorf at Hotel Nikko Düsseldorf. This will be followed by the DFHV Annual Conference on 15 May 2020. 

The organisers – Agrarmarkt Informations-Gesellschaft (AMI) and Fruchthandel Magazin – will be addressing a central topic in the sector, which is not only being strongly discussed in the entire value chain, but also in society. A press release stated: “Since the recent pictures of dead whales and polluted seas make this topic difficult to be ignored. We want to tackle the challenges and take a close look at them in order to discuss and sketch out alternatives and solutions with the competent experts in the end and thus give the industry new impetus. We want to bring together the most important market partners in the European sector in order to objectify the discussion and jointly develop new ideas and strategies for contemporary solutions and offers for the entire value chain.”

Simultaneous translation is provided of the plenary sessions in German and English.

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Prophet tracing fresh produce around the globe

Prophet is a leading designer and provider of supply-chain software for the food and horticultural sectors, with extensive expertise in fresh and chilled horticultural products, and was an official partner and sponsor at the show.

“Traceability is now expected by retailers, as opposed to something that’s nice to have,” Prophet customer relations director Paul Seekins told ED at the London Produce Show.

Prophet is a leading designer and provider of supply-chain software for the food and horticultural sectors, with extensive expertise in fresh and chilled horticultural products, and was an official partner and sponsor at the show.

Seekins said one of the competitive advantages of Prophet’s software is batch control.

“A batch can be as big or as small as you want it to be – it can be a ship, a truck or even down to a pallet – it gets a unique number no matter where it goes, if split down, packed, wasted or marketed, whatever, the identify of that batch goes with the product.

“It can end up on the shelf as something completely different but we can trace back to that raw product, who supplied it and potentially which field or tunnel it was grown in, depending on the requirements of that particular supply chain.”

Traceability is now much higher on the agenda for retailers and suppliers, Seekins said. In the US, fresh produce food scares – where, for example, people have died from food poisoning linked to eating melons – has highlighted the need for much higher levels of traceability.

“Because not only do you need to know that you have an issue now, you also need to know precisely who else has had that particular batch in order to be proactive and do a proper recall, without scaremongering everybody who might have ever bought something from you.”

“We specialise in fresh produce and therefore we deal with all kinds of it – everything here at the show is a commodity that is being transacted on our system somewhere in the world,” he said.

Prophet: http://www.prophet.co.uk/

London Produce Show: http://londonproduceshow.co.uk/

JB