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Romanians spend largest share on food and beverages

Romanians spend largest share on food and beverages, ct. Eurostat

 

EU consumers spent 12.1% of their total expenditure on food and non-alcoholic beverages, amounting to over €1.047 billion (or 6.6% of EU GDP), according to Eurostat data. Food and beverages ranks as the third largest category of household expenditure after ‘housing, water, electricity, gas and other fuels’ (24.0%), and ‘transport’ (13.2%). Romania is the country with the highest proportion of household expenditure on food and non-alcoholic beverages (27.8%), followed by Lithuania (20.9%) and Estonia (19.6%). The lowest proportions were recorded for the United Kingdom (7.8%), Ireland (8.7%), Luxembourg (9.1%) and Austria (9.7%).

Between 2008 and 2018, the share of total household expenditure on food decreased or remained stable in most EU Member States where 2018 data is available. The largest decrease was recorded in Lithuania (from 24.8% of total household expenditure in 2008 to 20.9% in 2018, or a fall of 3.9 percentage points), followed by Poland (-3.4 pp) and Malta (-3.0 pp). In contrast, household expenditure on food increased in 10 EU Member States where 2018 data is available. The largest increase was recorded in Czechia and Slovakia (both +1.4 pp), the Netherlands (+1.0 pp) and Hungary (+0.8 pp).

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Where are fruit & veg prices highest and lowest in Europe?

Among all 38 countries, the lowest prices for oils, fats, fruits, vegetables and potatoes ween seen in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and for other food products in Poland, while the highest prices for almost all categories were observed in Switzerland.

Romania is the EU’s most inexpensive country for fruit, vegetables and potatoes and Sweden the most expensive.

And generally speaking, fruit and vegetable prices are higher in Northern Europe and cheaper in Eastern Europe.

Those are some of the trends seen in Eurostat’s most recent survey on food, beverages and tobacco prices, carried out in 2015 and covered in an article on the website Eurostat Statistics Explained.

The article focuses primarily on price levels for food, beverages and tobacco in 38 European countries – 3 EFTA countries (Iceland, Norway and Switzerland) and 5 EU candidate countries (the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Albania, Serbia and Turkey), 1 potential candidate country (Bosnia and Herzegovina) and Kosovo, as well as the 28 EU Member States.

Among all 38 countries, the lowest prices for oils, fats, fruits, vegetables and potatoes were seen in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and for other food products in Poland, while the highest prices for almost all categories were observed in Switzerland.

The category of fruit, vegetables and potatoes includes fresh or chilled fruit, frozen, preserved or processed fruit and fruit-based products, fresh or chilled potatoes, frozen, preserved or processed vegetables and vegetable-based products.

Source: Comparative price levels for food, beverages and tobacco

 

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A third of EU residents don’t eat fruit or veg daily

Regular consumption of fruit and vegetables is considered an important part of a healthy and balanced diet. In the EU, however, slightly more than a third of the population aged 15 or over did not  eat them on a daily basis in 2014,

More than a third of the European Union population aged 15 or over did not eat fruit and vegetables on a daily basis in 2014.

And less than 15% consumed at least the recommended 5 portions a day, according to a Eurostat press release.

The European Union’s statistical office also said the daily consumption of fruit and vegetables differs widely between EU member states.

In Romania, for instance, almost two-thirds (65.1%) of the population aged 15 and over does not eat fruit and vegetables on a daily basis, while in Belgium, at the other end of the scale, it’s 16.5%.

Similarly, a third of those in the UK eat at least 5 portions of fruit or veg daily, compared to 3.5% in Romania and 4.4% in Bulgaria.

And when it comes to differences between men and for women, Eurostat said the daily consumption of fruit and vegetables seems to also be influenced by the level of education – the higher the education level, the higher the share of the “5-a-day” population.

The widest gap between low and high educated persons for “5-a-day” consumption was in the UK, where 40.5% of those with a high education consumed at least five fruit or vegetables each day compared to 25% for those with a low education level.

image: http://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/sfs/index_en.htm

 

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Highlights of EU fruit and vegetable production

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A recent Eurostat article included a handy snapshot of fruit and vegetable production in the EU. Based on the Eurostat publication ‘Agriculture, forestry and fishery statistics’, the article provides summaries of some of the main crops in the region, as follows:

Tomatoes
The EU is one of the main global producers of tomatoes. In 2013, it grew an estimated 14.9 million tons of tomatoes, of which about two thirds came from Italy and Spain.
Open-air production is typical in southern EU Member States and is complemented by all-season greenhouses production which is typical of countries such as the Netherlands or Belgium.

Carrots
About 5.1 million tons of carrots were grown by the EU-28 in 2013. Carrot production was relatively high in Poland and the UK — together these two countries accounted for a little over one quarter (14.3% and 13.5% respectively) of EU-28 output. Carrot tonnages have remained relatively stable – at around 0.7–0.8 million tons – in these two EU Member States over 2000–13 period.

Onions
The EU-28 produced about 5.7 million tons of onions in 2013.
The Netherlands and Spain are its two main onion producing countries, accounting for just over two fifths (44%) of total EU-28 output in 2013. Since 2006, production in the Netherlands has risen relatively sharply.

Fruit: Apples & Citrus
Around 12 million tons of apples were produced in the EU-28 in 2013. Apples are produced in almost all EU Member States, although Poland, Italy and France are by far the largest producers.
Citrus fruit production in the EU is much more restricted by climatic conditions; the vast majority of citrus fruit is grown by Spain.

Production of fruit and vegetables, 2013

source: ‘Agricultural production – crops’, Eurostat, 2015

image: by Thw1309 via Wikimedia Commons
 

 

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Eurostat reports 2014 price drops for EU-grown fruit, vegetables

Eurostat logo

 

The value of fresh vegetable production has fallen 6.5% and that of fruit 10.7% in the EU this year, according to estimates from Eurostat.

This was despite production volumes rising nearly 2% and 0.4% respectively in 2014 compared to 2013, it said in a news release. For potatoes, it said prices were down 24.5% but volumes up 5.5%.

Meanwhile, the value of EU28 agricultural crop production overall is down 6% on last year, “due to a significant decrease in prices (-9.5%), partly counterbalanced by an increase in volume (+3.8%),” the EU’s statistical office said.

On the inputs side, costs have decreased in real terms – by 6.4% for fertilisers and soil improvers, and almost 4% for energy and lubricants.

Farm worker incomes down 1.7%

Over 2005–2014, real agricultural income per worker in the EU climbed 34.4%, while agricultural labour input fell by 24.6%. Compared with 2005, the per worker income has risen in 19 EU states, remained almost stable in 3, and fallen in Luxembourg, Malta, Ireland, Finland, Croatia and Belgium.

However, relative to last year, real agricultural income per worker slipped 1.7% this year. The biggest drops were in Finland (-22.8%), Lithuania (-19.4%), Belgium (-15.2%), Italy (-11.0%), Estonia (-10.9%) and Denmark (-10.1%), and the highest increases in Slovenia (+13.3%), Hungary (+9.1%), the Czech Republic (+7.2%) and the UK (+6.9%). Greece, Cyprus, France and Germany (only just) were the only other states to see growth this year.

The estimates are based on data supplied by national authorities in the EU28 member states, Eurostat said.

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Read the release here.