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Chileans stand by Chinese partners during coronavirus outbreak

© Alexandra Sautois

 

Chilean Fruit Exports Association (Asoex) has offered support to China by offering to donate fresh fruits to the medical staff working to treat people affected by coronavirus. Containers filled with fresh Chilean produce sent to different ports across China had been held back due to the outbreak. With Chinese consumers turning to online markets to buy fresh produce, overall consumption has reduced. Shipping companies have been working to keep the containers in the market so as to increase availability of refrigerated storage.

In a statement issued by the organisation, Asoex president, Ronald Bown Fernandez, said: “It is complex, it requires constant monitoring as to how it evolves. We are relying on Chinese authorities to contain the virus, with the aim of returning to normalcy in the shortest period of time possible.” It’s unknown how long the current situation in China will last, with Asoex announcing it will work with the government to minimise the negative effectives by implementing a “specific campaign to promote the healthy attributes of fruit consumption”.

Around 265,000 tons of Chilean produce have been exported so far this season, with the main products being cherries, blueberries, table grapes, avocados, nectarines, plums, apples, and kiwifruit. This figure is up 27.7% from the same period last year.

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Global shipping stricken by coronavirus outbreak

Global shipping stricken by coronavirus outbreak, © Anthony Kwan, Getty Images

© Anthony Kwan, Getty Images

 

The coronavirus outbreak has taken a heavy toll on China’s shipping industry as a result of the lower output and trade. A report published by Danish maritime research group Sea-Intelligence highlighted the greatly reduced cargo flows between China and the rest of the world, with 50 sailings cancelled since January and 30 last week alone across the Pacific and to Europe. The Wall Street Journal reports that five European and Asian container ship operators are preparing profit warnings for the first half or the full year. This news comes as a great disappointment, especially as it had been hoped that the improved trading relationship between the US and China would result in an upsurge in business. The WSJ reports that at least one container ship with a capacity to carry over 20,000 containers left Shanghai for Northern Europe with only 2,000 full containers. “It will pick up more at ports on its way, but loading data show it will reach Europe around 35% full,” this broker said. “That’s unprecedented, and a lot of money is being lost because it doesn’t even cover the fuel cost.”

According to the report published by Sea-Intelligence, over 350,000 containers have been removed from global trade since the Chinese New Year. These woes are estimated to be costing the shipping sector around US$350 million a week.