Posted on

Citrus sales climb 8.2% in value in US

Having overtakes berries, citrus is now America’s 2nd fastest growing fruit category.

The spend on citrus fruit in the United States grew 8.2% year-on-year in the 52 weeks to July 30 to reach just under $3 billion.

But Nielsen data shows the rise in the volume of retail sales of citrus over the same period was not so marked, coming in at 3.6% to push the total to slightly over 2.27 billion lb.

While limes, oranges and lemons made the biggest contribution to the sales volumes, mandarins (39.6%) and oranges (26.8%) were the top fruits in terms of spend.

Compared to the previous year, sales of mandarins in the US enjoyed the strongest growth in both volume (up 12.7% to nearly 244 billion lb) and value (up 15.3%).

Also logging growth were limes (up 5.9% in volume and 14.6% in value) and lemons (up 4.7% in volume and 9.3% in value).

There was very little change for oranges, with the volume inching up 0.1% to just over 660 million lb and virtually the same spend.

Although the volume of grapefruit sales fell slightly (-2.6%) this year, the dollar value climbed 4.2%. Tangerines suffered the greatest fall, plummeting 26.7% in value and 16.1% in volume.

Specialty fruits, which make up a relatively small chunk of the citrus fruit market, also dropped both in volume (-11.6%) and value (-7.6%).

Source: Nielsen 

Posted on

Interview of the Month: the US Food Marketing Institute’s Rick Stein

“The ability to trace product back to its source is a critical part of the new produce supply chain,” says the US Food Marketing Institute’s Rick Stein.

The voice of food retail in the United States is the Food Marketing Institute (FMI). Here the trade association’s vice president for fresh foods, Rick Stein, pinpoints what’s happening in his country on major issues for the sector. Stein was previously vice president of retail merchandising and marketing execution for Safeway, where he led marketing activities for the company’s eastern division spanning 180 locations and 20,000 employees.

What are the main challenges for fresh produce distribution in the US?

When it comes to providing fresh foods in retail, food safety is the utmost priority for the US retail food industry. The industry is doing a good job keeping food safe. According to the 2016 US Grocery Shopper Trends report, 9 in 10 shoppers have confidence in the safety of food at the grocery store.

As for fruit and vegetable distribution in the US, the produce supply chain is unique because products have a short shelf life, require fast distribution and temperature control is essential. We’re also often dealing with fresh foods being transported long distances. More fresh food providers in the US are relying on improved data quality to help address these elements of the produce supply chain. By optimising quality data, producers are better able to share data with retailers so they can provide a more transparent picture to shoppers about the path their produce took from farm to store. This ability to trace product back to its source is a critical part of the new produce supply chain and many US retailers and packers/shipper or implementing traceability initiatives.

In addition, shopper demand for local fruit and vegetables is changing the produce supply chain. Finding local sources, ensuring those sources have safe food, and getting product to shelf quickly is an emerging trend that is resulting in many new supply chains within the US produce business.

What are the latest improvements in food safety and sustainability?

Right now, food retailers and manufactures in the US are working to implement the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), the most sweeping regulation of the US food safety system in 70 years. FSMA fundamentally changes the way food is regulated in the US and abroad and affects the entire supply chain from farm-to-fork. FSMA focuses more on preventing food safety problems rather than relying primarily on reacting to problems after they occur. FMI has worked closely with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) throughout the FSMA implementation process and continues to offer our members resources, training and implementation guidance.

FMI is also working on the issue of food waste. Every year, about 40 million tons of food waste is sent to landfills in the US. FMI has joined with the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) and the National Restaurant Association (NRA) to form the Food Waste Reduction Alliance (FWRA). This group has three major business goals: 1.) Reduce food lost within our operations so it never becomes food waste in the first place; 2.) Recover safe and nutritious food that might have been wasted by sending it to our partnering food banks; and 3.) Recycle unavoidable food waste by diverting away from landfill and moving it to productive use, including animal feed, compost or food to energy.

What is being done to promote fruit and vegetable consumption?

According to FMI’s Shopping for Health 2016 report, two-in-three US shoppers agree that food choices affect their health, but half say they struggle to find the motivation to eat healthfully. At the same time, FMI’s Power of Produce 2016 report finds shoppers are choosing produce as part of a healthier lifestyle and eating habit.

Grocery stores are uniquely positioned to be key partners in health and wellness for the communities they serve, including helping to increase consumption of fresh foods. Food retailers have the opportunity to help their customers find and distinguish dietary choices, offer weight management solutions and share convenient meal ideas that help feed families. Some of the actions retailers take to incentivise more fruit and vegetable consumption start with the location of produce near the entry of the store. Also, the location of produce on the front page of their advertising circulars is another way supermarkets highlight their produce.

Many US food retailers are transitioning their stores into health destinations and that includes offering more resources for shoppers to increase their fruit and vegetable consumption. According to the 2014 FMI report on Retailer Contributions to Health and Wellness, 95% of US grocery stores surveyed employ dietitians at the corporate, regional and store levels. In addition to offering nutrition counseling, grocery stores are helping shoppers develop culinary skills. More than half of the food retailers in this survey employ chefs at the corporate level and 74% of respondents have offered cooking classes to customers.

In the US, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans offer an opportunity for food retailers and manufactures to help Americans eat a healthier diet. Many retailers and manufactures help support this information by making it available to customers on packages, in store, online and through their nutrition counseling services.

How are online sales, home deliveries and the hard discounters affecting in store sales?

In the US, fresh produce is what brings shoppers to the grocery store. According to FMI’s Power of Produce 2016 report, 63% of US shoppers prefer the supermarket for their produce purchases. Consumers cite concerns over product freshness and quality, but also want control over selecting the produce they purchase. However, when the online shopping platform is supported by their primary brick-and-mortar grocery store, shopper interest increases.

When it comes to overall grocery shopping trends, the 2016 US Grocery Shopper Trends report finds 15% of shoppers occasionally purchase food or groceries online through a service or meal subscription. At the same time, 16% of US shoppers report purchasing fresh produce online in the past 12 months. This represents an opportunity for US food retailers to further enhance their online produce offerings, while also creating unique in-store fresh food purchasing experiences for shoppers.

Photos provided by the Food Marketing Institute

Posted on

Health & organic food trends driving US sector

The US is a net fruit importer and among fresh fruit imports, bananas claim over half the volume. This fruit ranks number one in US per capita fresh fruit consumption, followed by apples and oranges, and is mainly imported from Guatemala, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Colombia, and Honduras.

Demand for high-quality health foods is expected to help boost the otherwise stagnant consumption rate of fresh fruit and vegetables in the US, a market with a widening trade deficit in fresh vegetables.

Per capita fruit and vegetable consumption is set to remain relatively constant in the United States over 2015-20, just as was the case in the last five years, says IBISWorld. However, thanks to the population most likely increasing at an annualised rate of 0.8% over this period, slow growth in overall fruit and vegetable consumption can be expected between now and 2020, it forecasts. Also, rising consumer interest in organic and locally grown produce should keep helping the industry remain resilient. “Fresh produce consumption will continue to be impacted by general economic and demographic trends, including rising disposable income levels for households, and particularly millennials.” However, consumer demand for high quality health foods will remain a primary factor in the overall increase of fresh fruit and vegetable consumption, the business intelligence publisher says.

Health trend favours frozen fruit

But the benefits of the health trend shouldn’t be over-rated, warns Euromonitor International. The market research provider said frozen fruit sales benefitted more than fresh fruit from the trends towards healthier diets which influenced the fresh food market in the US last year. It said that while Americans are increasingly eschewing heavily processed foods for fresh and natural offerings, something that would seem an incredible boon to the fresh food market, “what has resulted instead is high growth in minimally (but still) processed food rather than in fresh food.” “What fresh food lacks is the element of convenience – nor does it have an adequate shelf life for many consumers. Americans are convinced of the health benefits of a whole food diet, but are unwilling to commit the time and effort to a diet comprised primarily of fresh rather than processed food,” it said. However, on the plus side, fresh foods that are humanely and sustainably produced are expected to record unequivocal increases in the future, it predicts.

Less head lettuce, more leafy greens

When it comes to vegetables, the health trend was perhaps a reason that over the 15 years to the end of last year, per capita use of head lettuce decreased 44%, something the USDA Economic Research Service (ERS) said “in part, is attributed to consumers switching to dark-green and leafy products like collard greens, kale, and romaine lettuce.” Over the same period, per capita use of potatoes (for both fresh and processing uses) fell 17%, from 138 pounds in 2000 to 114 in 2015.

Total per capita use of vegetables and pulses in the US last year averaged 375 pounds – down 3% on 2014 and 12% from a peak in 2000. More specifically, per capita use of fresh vegetables (including potatoes, sweet potatoes, and mushrooms) averaged 181 pounds in 2015 – down 1% from 2014, but fairly steady since 2009-11. In 2015, per-capita use increased for many fresh market crops – such as sweet corn, bell peppers, cauliflower and romaine lettuce – while that of asparagus, cabbage, leafy greens, and head lettuce, among others, declined. In terms of share, potatoes, tomatoes, onions, all lettuce, and bell peppers accounted for a 60% share of fresh vegetables available for consumption in 2015, the ERS said.

Retail channels increasingly offer fresh food

Euromonitor says that over 2010-15, American retail channels have changed the way fresh food is sold, with “an increasing prevalence of packaged fresh food sold via retail. For example, grocers have encouraged volume sales of fruit and vegetables by cutting and packaging the items in-store. Such practices increase retail profits, as these minimally processed products are sold at much higher margins. Retail is also benefiting from the popularity of internet retailers, which are increasingly successful at fast delivery in order to maintain product freshness,” it said.

2014 top food retailers/ wholesalers in US
1. Walmart
2. Kroger
3. Costco Wholesale
4. Target
5. Safeway
source: PMA/Supermarket news 2014 top 75 food retailers & wholesalers in the US & Canada

US vegetable production remains flat

Potatoes (44 billion pounds), tomatoes (32 billion pounds) and lettuce (8.1 billion pounds) were the three leading vegetable crops grown last year in the US and together accounted for about two-thirds of its production of commercial vegetables and dry pulses (including mushrooms, sweet potatoes and potatoes). In total, the US produced 127 billion pounds in 2015 in this category – largely unchanged from a year earlier – with a value of $20 billion (up 6% on 2014 due to robust domestic prices for most fresh market crops) and from a harvested area of about 6.9 million acres, according to the ERS.

As for fresh market vegetables (excluding potatoes, sweet potatoes and mushrooms), in 2015, the US produced 34.8 billion pounds, down 3% yoy as the area harvested declined. Despite entering its fourth year of drought, California still lead the country in fresh market production, accounting for 54% of the country’s annual fresh market vegetable output. Florida regained its position as the second largest source of fresh market vegetables, with 3% of output, and Arizona, which ranked second in terms of production volume last year, saw production drop 10% in 2015.

The three largest crops in this category – delivering 40% of the total production – were onions, head lettuce, and sweet corn.

Potatoes and sweet potatoes

Potato production fell slightly from last year to 44 billion pounds, with Idaho (30% of production output), Washington (23%), and Wisconsin (6%) still the top producing states in 2015. The production value fell 2% to $3.8 billion. Sweet potato production last year was up 5% to 3.1 billion pounds off a harvested area of 153,100 acres (+13%). The top grower States were North Carolina (50% of total production), California (20%) and Mississippi (12%).

Rising vegetable trade deficit

The US trade deficit in fresh vegetables widened in 2015. In terms of volume, fresh vegetable imports rose 1% to 14 billion pounds while exports fell 4% to 4.4 billion pounds, probably due to a strong US dollar and weak global demand. Last year, about 22% of vegetables consumed domestically was imported while 13% was exported to foreign destinations. In the fresh vegetables category (including potatoes and mushrooms) – in which the value of imports rose 4% on 2014 to $7 billion – about a quarter of the produce used in the US in 2015 was imported, up from 9% in the early 1990s, while 20% of processed vegetables and 21% of the dry pulse markets were supplied by imports. Mexico accounted for 69% of import value in 2015, followed by Canada (17%), Peru (5%) and China (1%). The import volume from Mexico expanded while that from Canada declined.

Vegetable exports down

Fresh vegetable exports, as a share of supply, remained relatively steady at about 7% last year but their value fell 6% to $2.2 billion due to shrinking market shares in Japan and Mexico. Exports to the US’s top foreign destinations – Canada, Mexico, and Japan – dropped 8% to $87 million as Mexico alone decreased 17% to $1.9 billion. Canada now accounts for 77% of US fresh vegetable export value. Fresh exports have a discernible seasonal pattern, with volume peaking during May-July and reaching lows during September and February. Besides the weather, demand from Canada – the leading foreign market for US exports of fresh vegetables – influences this pattern, according to the USDA. Canada’s vegetable imports are lowest during their summer growing season and peak in the spring when supplies of storage-type vegetables are exhausted and before their own growing season has begun.

Among fresh vegetables, lettuce (all types) is the largest fresh export ($431 million in 2008), but lettuce also enjoys relatively strong domestic demand. The same is true for tomatoes, the second-largest fresh export ($208 million in 2008). Exports account for 9% of domestic supply of all lettuce and 6% of fresh tomatoes. This percentage has slowly drifted lower over the past three decades, as growth in domestic consumption has exceeded that of export volume.

Bananas the top fresh fruit import

The US is a net fruit importer and among fresh fruit imports, bananas claim over half the volume. This fruit ranks number one in US per capita fresh fruit consumption, followed by apples and oranges, and is mainly imported from Guatemala, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Colombia, and Honduras. Mexico is the largest supplier of fresh and frozen fruit to the US, accounting for over 30% percent of both the volume and value of fresh and frozen fruit imports (excluding bananas), reports the ERS. Mexico ships mostly limes, tangerines, mangoes, grapes, pineapples, papayas, avocados and strawberries. Geographic proximity and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) give Mexico a competitive advantage over other exporting countries. Chile is also a major supplier of fresh fruit, with a 20% share of the US import market, and boasts the advantage of counter-seasonal production, meaning it can offer fresh fruit at times when the US grows little, particularly over November to March. The US is the world’s largest importer of watermelons, taking a fifth of the global import volume, with its main sources being Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua. These five nations also account for nearly all US cantaloupe imports.

Top fruit exports: apples, grapes, oranges

US exports of fresh market fruit account for about 15% of available supplies. In value terms, fresh market fruit exports (excluding melons) amounted to over $3 billion each year during 2008-10, capturing more than half of total fruit exports (excluding tree nuts).

The leading fresh fruit exports are apples, grapes, and oranges (including tangerines), with combined sales averaging over $1.5 billion annually, or about half the value of fresh fruit exports. Apples and grapes averaged over $700 million and over $600 million, respectively, in annual export sales during 2008-10, and oranges, over $500 million. Export sales of fresh berries, led by strawberries, more than tripled between 2000 and 2010 for a combined value of over $500 million.

Canada is the leading destination for US fresh fruit, generally accounting for over one-third of all fresh fruit exports. Other major markets are Mexico, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea.

Melons a major export

The US is among the top melon exporters in the world, ranked third in watermelon exports next to Mexico and Spain and fourth in cantaloupe and other melon exports after Spain, Guatemala, and Brazil. Melon exports increased slightly in share of US melon supplies, from 3-4% in the 1970s and 1980s to an average 7% during the 2000s. Watermelons accounted for more than half of US melon export volume in recent years, averaging over 300 million pounds, nearly one-tenth of the world’s total. An overwhelming majority of watermelon export volume goes to Canada, but Mexico and Japan are also relatively important markets for the US watermelon industry. Canada is also the primary destination for US cantaloupe exports, with Mexico serving as a distant second.

JB

Sources: IBISWorld, USDA ERS, Euromonitor

Posted on

US ponders new rule for Chilean lemon imports

Chilean lemons would be allowed into the US without needing methyl bromide fumigation under a change being considered by the US Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (Aphis).

Chilean lemons would be allowed into the US without needing methyl bromide fumigation under a change being considered by the US Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (Aphis).

Fumigation is currently required to reduce the risk of infestation by the false red mite. But under the possible new rule, commercial consignments would be allowed into the US subject to the following ‘systems approach’:

  • the production sites where the lemons are grown would have to be registered annually with the national plant protection organisation (NPPO) of Chile and certified as low prevalence production sites,
  • shipments would be subject to post-harvest processing and phytosanitary inspection in Chile at an Aphis-approved inspection site,
  • any shipment not passing initial inspection could still be imported if fumigated with methyl bromide in Chile or at the post of first entry into the US,
  • all consignments would have to be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate from the NPPO of Chile containing an additional declaration that the fruit was produced according to the import requirements.

On or about April 4, Aphis will publish the proposed new rule and open a 60-day comment period. Once published, comments on the proposed rule can be submitted on-line here.

Source: Aphis stakeholder announcement

Posted on

Imports capture under 10% of US fresh apple demand

Imports are a growing presence in the US fresh apple market but still small relative to domestic production, according to the publication ‘Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook: Economic Insight US Fresh-Market Apples’.

Less than one in ten fresh apples eaten in the United States in the last five years was grown abroad, figures from a USDA report show.

That’s up from an average of one in twenty in the 1980s.

But while imports are a growing presence in the US fresh apple market, they are still small relative to domestic production, according to the publication ‘Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook: Economic Insight US Fresh-Market Apples’.

It says the the US is a leading importer of fresh apples and the amount of globally sourced fresh apples in the US has risen significantly since the 1980s – from an average 237 million pounds in the 1980s to almost 400 million pounds over the last 5 years. “Record imports were reported in 2003/04 at 472.7 million pounds. Import share of domestic fresh apple use has risen from a 5% average in the 1980s to around 8% over the last 5 years.”

Chile the US’s main foreign source of fresh apples

With counter seasonal production, Chile accounts for over 60% of total import volume, making it by far the US’s top foreign source of fresh apples.

It has emerged as a strong supplier over the past decade having “successfully developed a more export-oriented apple industry and benefited from the growing demand in the Northern Hemisphere for off-season fruit.”

New Zealand, Canada and Argentina account for most of the rest of US fresh apple imports.

Imports continue to be concentrated over the US summer but the combination of new varieties with later harvest dates and the increased use of more sophisticated storage technology have enabled the US apple industry to move domestic apples more evenly across the marketing season. “Even in summer months when import volumes are increased, domestic production dominates fresh apples shipped throughout the year.”

“The marketing season for US apples runs from August through July. Harvesting occurs between August and November, but the ability to store apples for a long period and counterseasonal import availability permit more even distribution of supplies throughout the year, which mitigates seasonal price variability.”

US apple exports

Five countries – Mexico, Canada, India, Taiwan, and the United Arab Emirates – account for more than half of US apple exports, with Mexico alone taking more than a quarter.

More than 60% of the total export volume for the marketing year is shipped between October and the following March, partly coinciding with the fall harvest.

High hopes for more exports to China

The report says a bright spot in US apple exports is the prospect of future sales increases to China.

“The 2015/16 season will be the first full marketing year with expanded market to China and already, export volume this season through January is 98% higher than the same time in 2014/15. The US apple industry estimates that within two years, exports to China will reach a value of nearly $100 million per year.”

source: Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook: Economic Insight US Fresh-Market Apples

Posted on

US to allow import of citrus from all parts of Peru

APHIS (the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection) has announced it s amending fruit and vegetable regulations to allow citrus fruit from any part of Peru to be imported into the continental United States, but with conditions.

APHIS (the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection) has announced it s amending fruit and vegetable regulations to allow citrus fruit from any part of Peru to be imported into the continental United States, but with conditions.

A fruit fly management program must be in place, including the use of bait spray applications, registration of places of production and citrus fruit shipments must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate, APHIS said in a recent bulletin.

Under current regulations, the importation of citrus fruit to the US is allowed from five approved citrus-producing zones in Peru, subject to a systems approach.

“However, based on the findings of a pest list and commodity import evaluation document, we have determined that this systems approach also mitigates the plant pest risk associated with citrus fruit produced in all other areas of Peru,” APHIS said. “This action will allow the importation of citrus fruit from the entire country of Peru while continuing to provide protection against the introduction of plant pests into the continental United States.”

This final rule will be effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register and will be available as of today (Monday, September 14) at:
http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=APHIS-2015-0005

Posted on

US nearly triples its fresh vegetable imports from China

The United States’ imports of fresh vegetables from China grew 185% in value to $214.3 million in the five years to 2013, a report by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) shows.

The United States’ imports of fresh vegetables from China grew 185% in value to $214.3 million in the five years to 2013, a report by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) shows.

Though off a much smaller base, the value of its its fresh fruit imports from China also grew over the same period, rising 61% to $21.8 million.

Meanwhile, in the opposite direction, the value of fresh fruit imports from the US by China rose 116%, to $119.5 million, and that for vegetables 719% to $3.84 million.

According to the report “China’s Growing Demand for Agricultural Imports”, China has overtaken Japan, Mexico, and Canada to become the leading export market for US agricultural products. Projections by the USDA and other sources anticipate continued growth in Chinese agricultural imports through 2023.

As for China’s agricultural exports, they are mainly labor-intensive, high-value (per unit of land) products that often require processing. US vegetable imports from China include garlic and mushrooms.

source: USDA

Posted on

US proposes accepting citrus from throughout Peru

Citrus fruit from the entire country of Peru could be imported into the continental United States under a change proposed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS).

Citrus fruit from the entire country of Peru could be imported into the continental United States under a change proposed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS).

Citrus imports are already allowed to the US from five approved citrus-producing zones in Peru subject to a ‘systems approach’. APHIS has determined this approach also mitigates the plant pest risk associated with citrus fruit produced in all other areas of Peru.

Currently, the regulations allow the import of fresh grapefruit, lime, mandarin, orange, tangerine or hybrids, sweet orange, and tangelo from the five approved citrus-producing zones in Peru.

The proposed rule would allow the import of these fruits from the entire country of Peru into the continental United States – excluding Hawaii and the U.S. Territories – under the same conditions currently in place.

APHIS said the change is expected to increase the area in Peru approved to produce citrus for export to the United States to about 1,500 hectares over 3 years. “Additional volumes of citrus expected to be shipped to the United States are 5,000 metric tons (MT) in the first year that the rule is in effect, 6,500 MT in the second year, and 8,000 MT in the third year. These quantities are equivalent to less than 1 percent of annual U.S. citrus production or U.S. citrus imports,” it said.

The comments period is open until June 30.

Find out more here.

 

 

 

 

Posted on

US Government expected to make record apple buy

“The largest USDA apple purchase in history” is how the US Apple Association describes the US Department of Agriculture’s plans to buy fresh apples and processed apple products for surplus removal.

“The largest USDA apple purchase in history” is how the US Apple Association describes the US Department of Agriculture’s plans to buy fresh apples and processed apple products for surplus removal.

In its announcement of the purchase program, the USDA did not specify an amount, but the association said it would include 34.9 million pounds of fresh apples and 16.1 million pounds of processed apple products. It said the bonus buy, with an estimated value of $18.3 million, will supplement the USDA’s supply for nutrition programs, such as the school lunch program.

“Coming on the heels of what was likely the largest apple crop in US history, this USDA purchase is welcome news and we thank the department for it,” said US Apple Association president & CEO Jim Bair.

The USDA said an invitation for bid (solicitation) will be issued in the near future for deliveries August through December.

 

USDA announcement

US Apple Association press release

 

Posted on

Opportunities in the EU for US exporters of organic produce

Screenshot 2015-02-12 at 11

The growing market for organic products in the EU offers opportunities for US exporters affecting various kinds of produce, a new report by the US Department of Agriculture says.

The USDA said while trade is generally determined mainly by quality, price and local availability and demand, opportunities for US exporters include:

  • Sweet potatoes: the market for sweet potatoes is growing. EU demand for potato varieties is up. The US is the best year round supplier of sweet potatoes at competitive prices.

  • Fresh vegetables like onions, broccoli and lettuce: especially the UK.

  • Fresh fruit: especially in those countries with no local availability, there is demand for a great variety of fresh fruit from the US. There is seasonal (October through March) demand for apples and pears in northwestern Europe. Demand in the same region is also strong for US citrus (grapefruit and minneola). There is year round demand for fresh, dried, sweetened cranberries and demand continues to grow. Growing demand for other fruits includes grapes, strawberries and cherries.

Trade in organic products between the US and the EU

The report says that from 2011 to 2014, the largest increase in US exports of organic produce to the EU occurred in fresh grapes and reached USD 4.7 million in 2014 (2011: USD 0.8 million). In 2014, the value of US organic grape exports to the EU exceeded the export value of organic apples which used to be the most important US organic export commodity in 2012 and 2013.

Other important US organic export products to the EU after grapes and apples include strawberries, blueberries, peppers, and cauliflowers.

In 2014, most US organic exports to the EU occurred during October (grapes and apples) and November (grapes).

US exports to the EU of organic products which are covered by HS codes (introduced in 2011) reached USD 12.3 million in 2014. This compares to an increase of 77 percent from 2011 to 2014, the USDA said.

us exports organic.png

us top importers eu.png

Figure 2. Top 10 EU countries with the highest organic sales USD per person, 2013 figures

Top 10 EU countries with the highest organic sales USD per person, 20.png

 

Top 10 largest organic markets in the EU, million USD, 2013 figures

Top 10 largest organic markets in the EU, million USD, 2013 figures.png

 

Read “Plenty of opportunities for U.S. organics in the EU market”

USDA Foreign Agricultral Service (FAS) Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) report