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Spanish highlight active substances in imported citrus fruit

Spanish highlight active substances in imported citrus fruit

Spanish representatives have called on the EU to deal with phytosanitary issues relating to imported citrus. A study by the Unió de Llauradors published this week found 50 active substances banned in the EU present in citrus fruit imported from South Africa in quantities exceeding the maximum residue level (MRL). This situation is particularly problematic not only for the health risks to which consumers are being subjected, but also due to the fact that EU citrus fruit producers cannot apply the same methods for fighting pests and diseases as their competitors, resulting in higher costs. One of the substances identified is the weed-killer Paraquat, which can affect the functioning of a number of organs, including the heart and kidneys. Another substance found was azinphos-methyl, a highly toxic insecticide banned in the EU since 2006.

 

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French pesticide ban could aid US cherry exporters in other EU markets

While US cherry exports to France will be prohibited this year, due to the Dimethoate ban, on the positive side for US cherry exporters is that France’s production is likely to be impacted by the ban on the pesticide – the French cherry crop is likely to be smaller and pricier – thus creating opportunities for France’s competitors in the EU, such as the UK.

France’s ban on cherry imports from countries where the pesticide Dimethoate is used has left fruit importers and traders fearing the country may soon apply similar bans involving other EU-approved pesticides or chemicals, according to a report by the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS).

Should their fears come true, this would be akin to a “de-facto shutting down the free movement of EU and third-country fruits and vegetables into France,” the report says.

While US cherry exports to France will be prohibited this year, due to the Dimethoate ban, on the positive side for US cherry exporters is that France’s production is likely to be impacted by the ban on the pesticide – the French cherry crop is likely to be smaller and pricier – thus creating opportunities for France’s competitors in the EU, such as the UK, the report says.

“On April 22, 2016, France temporarily banned the import and sales of cherries imported from countries where the chemical product dimethoate can be used on cherries and cherry trees. It follows the ban of its use for domestic production. Dimethoate was used to fight Drosphila suzukii, an Asian fruit fly which causes considerable damages in cherry orchards but is suspected by France of being dangerous to human health.

“France imports roughly one fifth of its consumption, the bulk coming from EU countries including some (such as Spain, Italy and Spain) that have already banned dimethoate. The French prohibition will de facto suspend imports of cherries from the United States, valued at around $1 million annually.

On the other hand, as France’s production is likely to be impacted by the ban on the pesticide, French cherries are likely to be scarcer and more expensive, creating opportunities for competitors on traditional French export markets such as the UK.”

Overview of French cherry production and trade

France is a minor producer of cherries in the EU and its production has been declining steadily over the past few years. Most of its cherry production is concentrated in the country’s south and southwest. Its cherry exports go mostly to neighboring countries, such as Germany, Belgium and the UK.

A net importer of cherries, the bulk of France’s imports come from the EU (Spain, Belgium, and Germany) and Turkey. Chile is the main supplier of winter cherries.

The US has a niche market in France for late summer cherries (from mid- July to August) and French imports of US cherries (mainly from Oregon and Washington) are valued at about $ 1 million annually. It should also be noted that about half the cherries listed as imported from Netherlands are in fact US or Canadian cherries that cleared customs in that country.

Source: GAIN Report FR1606, 5/20/2016 “U.S. Cherries Exports to France hit by French Pesticide Ban”

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Successful debut of Probelte Forum on crop protection for sustainable agriculture

A debate organised by the company ProbelteFito on use of phytosanitary products and sustainable agriculture drew an attendance of more than a hundred people in Murcia last Thursday (May 19).

A debate on use of phytosanitary products and sustainable agriculture drew an attendance of more than a hundred people in Murcia last Thursday (May 19).

Organised by the company ProbelteFito, the forum was held under the title ‘Moving towards sustainable agriculture for healthy food’ and as live streamed on video.
In a press release, ProbelteFito said the forum surveyed the current regulatory framework for use of phytosanitary products at both Spanish and European level. A comparison was made with the applicable legislation in other countries considered competitors in the fruit and vegetables market.

Much of the debate revolved around the information that reaches the consumer, which was considered sufficient but sometimes confusing, since Spain has tight control on the use of phytosanitary products this message does not always get through to consumers. “This adds to confusion in regard to organic products when the impression is given that that other foods are not healthy though in reality phytosanitary products, as expressed during the forum, are the “medicines of plants”.

Moderated by food journalist Francisco Seva, the forum included participation from Francisco Jose Gonzalez, Abelardo Hernandez, Felipe Medina, Andrés Antonio Martinez and Joaquín Ignacio Martinez, and was closed by ProbelteFito president Jose Manuel Casanova.

With over 45 years of experience in the agrifood sector, Probelte is dedicated to the manufacture and marketing of phytosanitary products, including plant protection, fertiliser and related products.

For more information: www.foroprobelte.es

 

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Probelte forum on making agriculture more sustainable

Respect for the environment and food security are at the heart of a debate in Murcia, Spain, today (May 19), organised by the company Probelte Fito.

Respect for the environment and food security are at the heart of a debate in Murcia, Spain, today (May 19), organised by the company Probelte Fito.

Under the title ‘Moving towards sustainable agriculture for healthy food’ this public forum will also share news of innovation in the field of plant protection and see experts share the latest in biotechnology and the development of low risk products, all with the aim of promoting progress towards use of increasingly ecological and sustainable agricultural products.

Specific topics covered will include current challenges in the plant protection sector from the point of view of consumers, the regulatory framework, technical requirements and farmers’ needs.

Probelte Fito is a company that promotes the reasonable use of products for plant nutrition and health in the pursuit of the sustainable production of safe, abundant and affordable quality food.

For more information: www.foroprobelte.es

 

 

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US ponders new rule for Chilean lemon imports

Chilean lemons would be allowed into the US without needing methyl bromide fumigation under a change being considered by the US Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (Aphis).

Chilean lemons would be allowed into the US without needing methyl bromide fumigation under a change being considered by the US Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (Aphis).

Fumigation is currently required to reduce the risk of infestation by the false red mite. But under the possible new rule, commercial consignments would be allowed into the US subject to the following ‘systems approach’:

  • the production sites where the lemons are grown would have to be registered annually with the national plant protection organisation (NPPO) of Chile and certified as low prevalence production sites,
  • shipments would be subject to post-harvest processing and phytosanitary inspection in Chile at an Aphis-approved inspection site,
  • any shipment not passing initial inspection could still be imported if fumigated with methyl bromide in Chile or at the post of first entry into the US,
  • all consignments would have to be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate from the NPPO of Chile containing an additional declaration that the fruit was produced according to the import requirements.

On or about April 4, Aphis will publish the proposed new rule and open a 60-day comment period. Once published, comments on the proposed rule can be submitted on-line here.

Source: Aphis stakeholder announcement

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Russia claims Israeli pepper shipment poses pest risk

Russia’s veterinary and phytosanitary authority Rosselkhoznadzor says more than 25 tons of peppers from Israel were detained at the Black Sea port Novorossiysk due to fear of the spread of the western flower thrip.

Russia has blocked the import of more than 25 tons of peppers from Israel, saying they pose a risk for the spread of western flower thrips.

The Russian veterinary and phytosanitary authority Rosselkhoznadzor said the move followed inspection at its main Black Sea port Novorossiysk, in the region of Krasnodar Krai.

In a statement in Russian on its website, it said the peppers had been detained to prevent the introduction and spread of the pest in the Russian Federation.

The authority also said that in the year to date, quarantine officers in Krasnodar Krai and the Republic of Adygea have already detained 4 pepper shipments, totalling more than 60 tons, because they did not did not meet Russia’s phytosanitary requirements.








 

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Spanish hopeful of Chinese market entry deals soon on stone fruit, grapes

BORRAR AQSIQ-English-Logo

Spain is optimistic its fresh plum, peaches and nectarines will soon be imported by China.

And it is also happy with progress on a protocol which would see the Asian giant also open its doors to fresh Spanish table grapes. Spanish Secretary of State for Trade Jaime García-Legaz said recently he hoped to have positive news by the end of the year.

Final report due on Spanish plums, peaches, nectarines

A spokesman from the Spanish Ministry of Economy told EFD the Chinese phytosanitary requirements for plums, peaches and nectarines have now been “practically cemented” by AQSIQ (China’s General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine).

 

In August, Chinese inspectors visited areas of plum, peach and nectarine production in Spain to verify the controls in place and their resulting assessment was regarded as “positive”, he said. After this visit, the Chinese phytosanitary requirements had been largely specified, “and it’s hoped that soon, perhaps before the end of this year, they will issue their final report and with that proceed to open the Chinese market for these products,” he said.

AQSIQ visits expected soon for Spanish table grapes

On grapes, he said Spain is waiting for China to complete its pest risk analysis, as part of which the phytosanitary requirements for this product will be determined. A visit by Chinese inspectors to Spanish production areas will follow.

 

No date has yet been set for these visits, but García-Legaz said he is optimistic about having “good news” in coming weeks about the scheduling of the visits and anticipates they will take place as early as possible in 2015.

 

In 2013, China imported table grapes worth US $514 million. Spain already has a citrus protocol with China – signed in 2005 after six years of negotiation – and believes its early stone fruit season will give it an edge there.

 

Learn more about the Chinese market in our recent report How fruit fared in China in 2013”