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Are South Koreans losing appetite for apples?

South Korea’s per capita apple consumption increased to 11.4 kilograms in 2015 from 7.5 kg in 2005, driven by the abundant apple crop (582,846 MT) and a growing public perception of apples as a healthy and nutritional fruit. However, since 2015, apple consumption has gradually decreased to 9.2 kilograms per capita due to increased competition with other imported fruits. In fact, between 2005 and 2015, South Korea’s fruit imports increased by 49% to 720,000 tons, following new FTAs with major fruit exporting countries such as Chile, the US, Australia, and New Zealand. 

As the ratio of small family (single or two family member households) increased steadily in recent years, food consumption trend also changed toward demand for more convenient and smaller packages of healthy and nutritional food products.

South Korea exports very few of its apples as domestic apple prices are more attractive to apple growers and demand remains strong. Currently, South Korean phytosanitary regulations do not allow fresh apple imports.

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Romanians spend largest share on food and beverages

Romanians spend largest share on food and beverages, ct. Eurostat

 

EU consumers spent 12.1% of their total expenditure on food and non-alcoholic beverages, amounting to over €1.047 billion (or 6.6% of EU GDP), according to Eurostat data. Food and beverages ranks as the third largest category of household expenditure after ‘housing, water, electricity, gas and other fuels’ (24.0%), and ‘transport’ (13.2%). Romania is the country with the highest proportion of household expenditure on food and non-alcoholic beverages (27.8%), followed by Lithuania (20.9%) and Estonia (19.6%). The lowest proportions were recorded for the United Kingdom (7.8%), Ireland (8.7%), Luxembourg (9.1%) and Austria (9.7%).

Between 2008 and 2018, the share of total household expenditure on food decreased or remained stable in most EU Member States where 2018 data is available. The largest decrease was recorded in Lithuania (from 24.8% of total household expenditure in 2008 to 20.9% in 2018, or a fall of 3.9 percentage points), followed by Poland (-3.4 pp) and Malta (-3.0 pp). In contrast, household expenditure on food increased in 10 EU Member States where 2018 data is available. The largest increase was recorded in Czechia and Slovakia (both +1.4 pp), the Netherlands (+1.0 pp) and Hungary (+0.8 pp).

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Turkey’s municipalities to sell fruit and vegetables

Turkey’s municipalities to sell fruit and vegetables

Local authorities in Turkey are to start selling vegetables and fruits to combat the country’s food inflation. Speaking at an event organised by the Turkish Exporters’ Assembly (TİM), finance minister, Berat Albayrak, identified inflation as one of the vulnerabilities of the Turkish economy and said the government is fighting with determination. According to the latest official data, food prices increased by 6.4% in January from the previous month, and the annual increase was 30.7%. Last month, fresh vegetable and fruit prices jumped 29.7% on a monthly basis, while the annual rise for those items was 64%.

Meanwhile, state-run bank Ziraat Bankasi will unveil a package designed to support greenhouse farming, with loans at low interest rates subsidies. “With this support, we will witness the fast transformation [of greenhouse farming]. Geothermal resources will be used in an effective way to that end. The state, which will also play an active role in this field, will become a strategic investor in greenhouse farming,” Albayrak said.

Source: Hurriyet Daily News