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Russian growers of berries will discuss the berry market outlook at Berries of Russia conference

Bilberries - Russian growers of berries will discuss the berry market outlook at Berries of Russia conference

The 3rd International Conference «Berries of Russia 2020» will be organized by the Russian Berry Union and FruitNews Information Agency on February 27–28, 2020 in Kazan.

The participants are berries breeders and growers, the representatives of nurseries and transform industry, the manufacturers of plant protection and hothouses equipment, traders and retailers, scientific and educational institutions. They will share their opinions and suggestions, evaluate berries production and market outlook, find out the news concerning technologies, berries varieties, etc.

Berries Union joins berries growers and processors and aims to stimulate the development of Russian berries industry, the increase of berries offer and quality improvement.

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Dried berries driving growth in US cranberry exports

America’s cranberry farmers are in the homestretch of the harvest in what looks to be another banner year for US cranberry production, reports the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service.

America’s cranberry farmers are in the homestretch of the harvest in what looks to be another banner year for US cranberry production, reports the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service.

A bountiful crop of 8.59 million barrels or 390,000 tons is forecast for 2016 and just over a third of it will be exported to long-established markets in Europe and Canada, and also newer markets in Mexico, South Korea and China, it said in the report Cranberries: No Longer Just an American Tradition.

But it is dried rather than fresh cranberries that are driving growth in US cranberry exports.

“Demand growth for cranberries is tied to the popularization of sweetened, dried cranberries with strongest demand growth from markets with increasing populations and per capita income,” the report says.

EU tariff concerns

Cranberries are native to North America. The US is the world’s top cranberry producer and top supplier of cranberries to the EU, which is its biggest market for this product.

Processed cranberry exports surged in 2011 when the EU waived a 17.6% import duty on dried cranberries.

“The duty suspension for processed cranberries is up for review by the EU in 2017, but the trading landscape has changed. On October 30, 2016, Canada and the EU signed the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), which will eliminate and reduce tariffs between the EU and Canada. Canada is the second largest producer and exporter of cranberries, and through CETA, Canada has secured permanent duty-free access for processed cranberry exports to the EU.

“Also, Chile—the third largest producer of cranberries globally— signed a trade agreement with the EU and has had permanent duty free access since 2012.”

However, the US does not have such a free trade agreement in place with Europe.

“If the EU does not renew the duty suspension on US cranberries, US producers and exporters will have a more difficult time competing with Canada and Chile to service the largest market for processed cranberries,” the report says.
 

Source: Cranberries: No Longer Just an American Tradition, November 22, 2016 International Agricultural Trade Reports
Cranberry harvest image: USDA Agricultural Research Service

 

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Cranberry production up slightly in US

The United States cranberry crop this year is forecast to come in at 8.41 million barrels, up slightly from 2014, but below that of 2013, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS).

The United States cranberry crop this year is forecast to come in at 8.41 million barrels, up slightly from 2014, but below that of 2013, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS).

In a publication on August 13, NASS said many growers in Wisconsin reported damage due to cold winter temperatures but even so, most had reported a normal to slightly better than normal season so far.

In Massachusetts, grower comments were mixed. “Some growers were optimistic, some were repairing bogs, and others reported problems with insects. Oregon and Washington producers expect 2015 to be a good year due to favorable weather conditions,” NASS said.
 

Image by Keith Weller, USDA-ARS [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons