Produce/Citrus

The growth of the world’s citrus trade

Valencian association laments absurd prices of South African citrus

Valencian association laments absurd prices of South African citrus

Published on Aug 06th, 2019

The Valencian Farmers’ Association (AVA-ASAJA) has complained about the “nonsense” prices currently being fetched by South African citrus in European retailers. After what the association has described as a “ruinous campaign” for Valencian producers, with prices not even meeting production costs at some points, South African citrus is now going for four times the price. The association goes on to claim that the fruit from South Africa is produced under worse socio-labour conditions than those produced in the Valencian Community.

Argentina to ships lemons

Argentina to ships lemons

Published on Jul 31st, 2019

Argentina’s lemon producers have gained access to the lucrative Indian market. As of 2020, the South American country’s lemons will be able to enter India, following the signing of a protocol agreement between the two countries. A new brand “Frutas de Argentina” has recently been launched to promote Argentine lemons in the Indian market. And there is more good news for the Argentinian produce sector: India will also be receiving Argentine chia from next year.

Hard times for Moroccan citrus

SanLucar annouces its changed organizational structure

Significantly larger Spanish citrus crop expected

Significantly larger Spanish citrus crop expected

Published on Jul 09th, 2019

The 2018/19 Spanish citrus campaign is estimated to register an increase in crop size for all crops compared with the 2017/19 season, according to data published by Spain’s Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. The most notable growth is expected to be recorded in satsuma, where the harvest is set to soar by 31.3%). The next largest increase is forecast for lemon (21.5%), followed by clementine (+20.5%), orange (+14.3%), and grapefruit (+2.3%). 

Large EU citrus crop in 2018/19 campaign

Large EU citrus crop in 2018/19 campaign

Published on Jul 08th, 2019

The EU’s 2018/19 citrus production is estimated at 11.6 million tons, up 8% from 2017/18. The main contributor to this rise is the large Spanish crop that resulted from favourable weather conditions.  Indeed, Spain’s citrus output climbed 14.6% to reach 7.3 million tons. The quality of the crop is expected to be excellent. EU orange production is forecast at 6.5 million tons, up 4% due to increased volumes in Spain and Portugal. EU lemon production is estimated to be up 10% to 1.6 million tons, while EU grapefruit production is expected to increase by 2.8% to 110,000 tons.

Strong growth in Spain’s citrus output

Strong growth in Spain’s citrus output

Published on Jun 07th, 2019

The 2018-19 Spanish citrus crop has seen increases across the board, according to official data from the country’s Ministry of Agriculture. The largest increases are in satsuma (+31.3%), lemon (+21.5%), clementine (+20.5%), orange (+14.3%), tangerine hybrids (+13.9%) and grapefruit (+4.1%). Tangerine varieties were up 19.5% overall.

Representatives of Intercitrus tackle troubles afflicting sector

Representatives of Intercitrus tackle troubles afflicting sector

Published on May 08th, 2019

On 3rd May, members of Spanish citrus organisation Intercitrus held a working lunch with the Commissioner of Agriculture, Phil Hogan, as well as a delegation of the European People's Party (PPE) composed of the vice-president of this group, Esteban González Pons, the MEP and rapporteur for the reform of the CAP, Esther Herranz, and the president of the PP-CV, Isabel Bonig.

Spanish highlight active substances in imported citrus fruit

Spanish highlight active substances in imported citrus fruit

Published on May 08th, 2019

Spanish representatives have called on the EU to deal with phytosanitary issues relating to imported citrus. A study by the Unió de Llauradors published this week found 50 active substances banned in the EU present in citrus fruit imported from South Africa in quantities exceeding the maximum residue level (MRL). This situation is particularly problematic not only for the health risks to which consumers are being subjected, but also due to the fact that EU citrus fruit producers cannot apply the same methods for fighting pests and diseases as their competitors, resulting in higher costs.

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